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Latest news 2019-11-04: The giveaway of two signed copies of “Quack, quack, quack. Give my hat back!” has closed and the winning entrants have been selected. Thank you to everyone who took part.


10.5 The flowfram Package and the flowframtk Application

The LaTeX kernel provides a single-column mode through the use of \onecolumn (or the onecolumn class option) and two-column mode through the use of \twocolumn (or the twocolumn class option). The flowfram package provides a way to extend this so that you can have an arbitrary number of columns of arbitrary width and height placed in arbitrary locations.

The standard LaTeX declarations \onecolumn and \twocolumn automatically insert a page break before switching modes. One of the reasons for this page break is to ensure that there isn't a paragraph spanning different width columns as TeX's output routine doesn't set the line width until the end of the paragraph which would leave the tail end of the paragraph with the incorrect width at the start of the new column. The flowfram package doesn't automatically insert page breaks in this manner, but this inherent problem caused by the asynchronous behaviour of TeX's output routine is present if you have a paragraph spanning different width columns that have been defined using flowfram, so you need to take care.

These arbitrary columns are termed “flow frames” in the flowfram user manual [98], which is accessed using

texdoc ffuserguide

(If you just do

texdoc flowfram

you'll get the documented code instead.)

There are two other types of frames: “static frames” and “dynamic frames”. These two types of frames need to have their contents set explicitly. With static frames, the contents are typeset in a box on being set. With dynamic frames, the contents are stored in a macro and retypeset each time the frame is drawn on a page. The frames are drawn onto the page in the following order: static, flow, dynamic. Within each category, the frames are drawn in order of definition. If frames overlap, their contents will overlap. (In other words, the text inside one frame doesn't attempt to avoid collision with the text inside another frame.)

Frames may have a border drawn around them. The default border is just a rectangle, but other borders may be used. The paragraph shape is unaffected by the shape of the border but it can be changed either using TeX's \parshape primitive or one of the commands provided by the shapepar package [4].

Flow frames can be defined using

\newflowframe[page list]{width}{height}{x}{y}[label]

Static frames can be defined using

\newstaticframe[page list]{width}{height}{x}{y}[label]

Dynamic frames can be defined using

\newdynamicframe[page list]{width}{height}{x}{y}[label]

Each of these commands has a starred version that adds a rectangular border to the frame. The arguments are as follows:

page list
The list of pages on which this frame is visible. This may be one of the keywords: all, none, odd or even; or this may be a comma-separated list of page numbers or page ranges. Page ranges may be open-ended using <n⟩ for pages less than page ⟨n⟩ or >n⟩ for pages greater than page ⟨n⟩; or the ranges may be closed using n⟩-⟨m for pages between ⟨n⟩ and ⟨m⟩, inclusive. The page numbers referenced in the ⟨page list⟩ by default refer to the decimal value of the page counter. (For example, 1 means page 1 or page i or page I.) If the pages=absolute package option is used, then the page number refers to the absolute page number. If ⟨page list⟩ is omitted, all is assumed.

width
The width of the frame.

height
The height of the frame.

x
The x-coordinate of the bottom left-hand corner of the frame relative to the typeblock.

y
The y-coordinate of the bottom left-hand corner of the frame relative to the typeblock.

label
A label that uniquely identifies this frame.
The typeblock is the area where the text would be typeset if the document was in the regular one-column mode. Each frame can be referenced either by its label or by its index (starting from 1 for each frame type). For example, the first flow frame to be defined has an index equal to 1, and the first static frame to be defined also has an index equal to 1.

The contents of a static frame can be set using:

\setstaticcontents{id}{contents}

where the frame contents are given by ⟨contents⟩. For the unstarred version, ⟨id⟩ is the frame's index. For the starred version, ⟨id⟩ is the label. Alternatively, the contents can be set using the staticcontents environment:

\begin{staticcontents}{id}
contents
\end{staticcontents}

As before there is a starred version where ⟨id⟩ is the frame's label rather than its index.

The contents of a dynamic frame can be set in a similar manner using:

\setdynamiccontents{id}{contents}

or using the dynamiccontents environment:

\begin{dynamiccontents}{id}
contents
\end{dynamiccontents}

Unlike the static frames, you can also append text to a dynamic frame using:

\appenddynamiccontents{id}{text}

As before, these all have starred versions where ⟨id⟩ is the frame's label.

Note that verbatim text isn't permitted in a dynamic frame, even with the environment version. Make sure that you set the contents before the frame is displayed on the page.

Example

Static frames are useful for background images, as shown below. This is a simple document that uses the lipsum package [33] to generate dummy text. This is a contrived example that shows what happens when you have overlapping frames and what happens if you have a paragraph spanning flow frames of different widths. The document text is placed in the flow frames in the order of the frame definition, which is why the text starts on the right hand frame, as that was the first flow frame to be defined.

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}

\usepackage{lipsum}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{flowfram}

\newflowframe
  {0.6\textwidth}% width
  {0.3\textheight}% height
  {0.4\textwidth}% x position
  {0.7\textheight}% y position

\newflowframe{0.6\textwidth}{0.5\textheight}{0pt}{0.5\textheight}

\newflowframe*{\textwidth}{0.4\textheight}{0pt}{0pt}

\newstaticframe{2in}{2in}{0pt}{0pt}

\setstaticcontents{1}{\includegraphics[height=2in]{chicken}}

\begin{document}

\lipsum[1-4]

\end{document}

The rather unpleasant result is shown in Figure 10.6.

Figure 10.6: Overlapping Frames (flowfram package)
 
Image of document. The blocks of text appear jumbled. The dummy lorem ipsum text starts in a paragraph on the right and continues on the left, but the left-hand paragraph overlaps the right-hand one, causing the text to be obscured. The left-hand paragraph is longer than the right-hand paragraph and continues in a wider block at the bottom of the page, but the text at the start of this wider frame has retained the narrow paragraph width of the left-hand column. The final paragraph is the correct width but overwrites the image of a chicken. The bottom area of text is bordered by a rectangular frame. End of Image.

The issue caused by TeX's asynchronous output routine being unable to adjust the line width over a frame break can be seen by the shortened lines in the end part of the paragraph at the beginning of the lower frame. (The frame with the border.) The flowfram package notices the problem and issues a warning with a recommendation:

Package flowfram Warning: Moving to flow frame of unequal width,
(flowfram)                use of \framebreak advised, or text might not appear
correctly (difference = 137.9979pt, tolerance = 2.0pt)
As with all manual interventions, the use of

\framebreak

before the first word of the new frame (between “magna.” and “Nunc” in this example) should only be resorted to on the final version of the document, once all the text has been written.

Example 54. Advance Information Sheet

This example uses the flowfram package to create an advance information sheet for a book. The geometry package is used to set the margins. The page numbering is suppressed using the empty page style and the section numbering is suppressed by setting the secnumdepth counter to 0. (This just saves me from remembering to use the starred version of \section.) I've used the drm package [29] to illustrate a different font from those I've previously used, and I've used the pifont, which provides the dinglist environment that was mentioned in Volume 1. Recall \dimexpr from §2.1.3 Arithmetic, which is used here to calculate the position of the static frame.

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{drm}

\usepackage{pifont}
\usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{flowfram}

\pagestyle{empty}
\setcounter{secnumdepth}{0}

\newflowframe{0.6\textwidth}{\textheight}{0pt}{0pt}

\newdynamicframe{.3\textwidth}{\textheight}{.7\textwidth}{0pt}[sidepane]

\newstaticframe{2in}{2in}{\dimexpr(\textwidth-2in)}{0pt}[logo]

\setstaticcontents*{logo}{\includegraphics[width=2in]{dummy-logo}}

\begin{dynamiccontents*}{sidepane}
{\raggedright\bfseries\scshape\Large
Oh No! The Chickens Have Escaped
\par
}

\centering
\bigskip

\includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{chicken}

\bigskip

\begin{tabular}{@{}ll}
Genre:    & Children's Illustrated \\
          & Fiction\\
RRP:      & £5.99\\
Format:   & Paperback\\
Pages:    & 30\\
Pub Date: & 1st August 2014\\
ISBN:     & 978-x-xxxxxx-xx-x
\end{tabular}

\vfill

\includegraphics{barcode-qr}

\vfill

\end{dynamiccontents*}

\begin{document}\raggedright

\section{About the Book}

A fun illustrated children's story about some escaped chickens. 
Fred and Mabel are looking after Granny's chickens for the day
but, oh no, they've escaped. Will Fred and Mabel find them all
before the chickens get into the road or get eaten by the hungry fox?

\section{About the Author}

Dickie Duck lives somewhere or other and won the best fowl book
award in 2014. He likes writing silly stories about ducks and
chickens.

\section{Keypoints}

\begin{dinglist}{118}
 \item A fun way of teaching children to count.

 \item Children will enjoy the repetition and rhyme.

 \item Features chickens doing stupid things.

 \item Completely fictitious book encourages children's
imaginations.
\end{dinglist}

\section{Marketing}

\begin{dinglist}{118}
 \item Written by award-winning author.

 \item Illustrated by world famous artist.

 \item Some other really interesting marketing information.
\end{dinglist}

\section{Contact}

\begin{tabular}{@{}l}
Dickie Duck\\
1 The Street\\
Another Village\\
Some City\\
Imagineshire\\
YZ1 2AB
\end{tabular}

\end{document}

You can download or view this example document. It uses the sample images chicken.png and dummy-logo.png. It also uses the barcode-qr.pdf file created in Exercise 28.

The resulting document is shown in Figure 10.7.

Figure 10.7: Advance Information Sheet
 
Image of advanced information sheet. The page has a wide column on the left with the main body of text and a narrow column on the right. The unnumbered list uses a black diamond minus white X symbol ❖.

Left (main) column:

About the Book

A fun illustrated children's story about some escaped chickens. Fred and Mabel are looking after Granny's chickens for the day but, oh no, they've escaped. Will Fred and Mabel find them all before the chickens get into the road or get eaten by the hungry fox?

About the Author

Dickie Duck lives somewhere or other and won the best fowl book award in 2014. He likes writing silly stories about ducks and chickens.

Keypoints

  • A fun way of teaching children to count.
  • Children will enjoy the repetition and rhyme.
  • Features chickens doing stupid things.
  • Completely fictitious book encourages children's imaginations.

Marketing

  • Written by award-winning author.
  • Illustrated by world famous artist.
  • Some other really interesting marketing information.

Contact

Dickie Duck
1 The Street
Another Village
Some City
Imagineshire
YZ1 2AB

The right hand (narrow) column:

Oh No! The
Chickens Have
Escaped

[Image of chicken.]

Genre: Children's Illustrated Fiction
RRP: £5.99
Format: Paperback
Pages: 30
Pub Date: 1st August 2014
ISBN: 978-x-xxxxxx-xx-x

[Image of QR code.]

[Image of logo.]

End of Image.

If you find it a bit awkward to work out the dimensions and locations of the frames, there's a helper GUI application called flowframtk, which provides a graphical means of defining the frames. As with datatooltk and arara, this is a Java application so, if you want to use it, make sure you have an up-to-date version of the Java runtime environment installed on your computer.

To install flowframtk download the installer from flowframtk's home page. This is a .jar file. If your operating system knows how to run a .jar file, you should just be able to double-click on it, otherwise you can run it from the command line using:

java -jar flowframtk-0.7-installer.jar

(You may need to specify the full path to the .jar file. The version number 0.7 may also need to be changed if a new version has been produced since the time of writing this.)

Once flowframtk has been installed, it can be run either from your operating system's applications menu or from the command line using:

flowframtk

The main window is shown in Figure 10.8.

Figure 10.8: FlowframTk Main Window
 
Image of the main window showing a canvas with a grid and a horizontal and vertical toolbar with buttons.

Example 55. Advance Information Sheet (with flowframtk)

To illustrate the use of flowframtk, the rest of this section will use flowframtk to create the advance information sheet from Example 54. The result will be slightly different as I'm going to add some extra features such as coloured backgrounds.

For this example, I prefer to work in metric measurements so, to reduce rounding errors, I'm first going to set the storage unit to millimetres and the grid to centimetres. To set the storage unit, go to SettingsConfigure Image Settings. This opens the dialog box shown in Figure 10.9. Use the Storage Unit drop-down menu to change the unit to mm. Click on the green tick button to save this change and close the dialog window.

Figure 10.9: FlowframTk — Set the Storage Unit
 
Image of configuration dialog window that includes a drop-down menu labelled Storage Unit.

Next go to SettingsGridGrid Settings which will open the dialog window shown in Figure 10.10. Select the Rectangular tab (if not already selected) and change the major divisions to 1 cm and the sub-divisions to 2 or 4. Click on the green tick button to save this change and close the dialog window.

Figure 10.10: FlowframTk — Set the Grid
 
Image of grid setting dialog window. There are four grid options available: Rectangular (selected), Radial, Isometric, and Tschichold.

Next make sure the paper size is correctly set. I'm using A4 portrait paper, which can be selected through the SettingsPaper submenu. Now the TeX settings for the document need to be specified, so go to SettingsConfigure TeX/LaTeX Settings which will open the dialog window shown in Figure 10.11.

Figure 10.11: FlowframTk — Set the TeX/LaTeX Settings
 
Image of settings dialog with the Document Settings tab selected.

Recall from Example 54 that I used the 12pt class option. I can specify that I want this by changing the Normal Font Size drop-down menu to 12. I'm going to use the default article class so I've left the Use default class radio button selected. If I want to use a different class, for example scrartcl, then I would have to select the Use class radio button and type in the class name (without the extension) in the neighbouring field. Again, click on the green tick button to save the changes and close the window.

Next I need to specify the packages I want to use. This is done in the preamble editor, which is opened using the TeX/LaTeXPreamble menu item. Note that I don't include the geometry or flowfram packages since these will automatically be added when I later use the export function. Here are the packages (as from the previous example) and I've also added the code to set the empty page style and switch off the section numbering, but I've deferred it using \AtBeginDocument:

See Figure 10.12.

Figure 10.12: FlowframTk — Setting the Preamble
 
Image of preamble dialog window. This is a mini editor with the following text displayed:

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{drm}

\usepackage{pifont}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\AtBeginDocument{%
  \pagestyle{empty}%
  \setcounter{secnumdepth}{0}%
}
End of Image.

You can choose whether to show or hide the grid using the SettingsGrid sub-menu. I'm going to hide the grid but keep the rulers visible. Now I need to specify the margins. In Example 54 I had 0.5 in margins, but now I want to have a borderless document, so I'm going to set all the margins to zero. This is done using the TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Typeblock menu item, which opens the dialog shown in Figure 10.13. Make sure all the margins are set to 0. (For this example, you don't need the other settings in this dialog window.) Although the margins default to 0, you must still click on the green tick button to save and close the dialog. A grey rectangle should now be displayed on the canvas with the word “typeblock” in the bottom left hand corner of the rectangle. (With zero margins, it may be difficult to see the rectangle.)

Figure 10.13: FlowframTk — Setting the Margins
 
Image of typeblock dialog window.

Now select the rectangle tool either using the ToolsRectangle menu item or click on the rectangle button in the left tool bar. To draw a rectangle on the canvas, click where you want one corner and move the mouse to the location where the opposite corner should be and click there. For example, in Figure 10.14, I've created a rectangle with top left corner at (0 mm,0 mm) and bottom right corner at (130 mm,297 mm).

Figure 10.14: FlowframTk — Create a Rectangle
 
Image of main window with a wide long rectangle spanning the left side of the canvas.

This rectangle will represent the main flow frame in my document, but first I want to add a fill colour and remove the outline. To do this, I need to switch to the select tool (either using the ToolsSelect menu item or by clicking on the button in the side bar with an arrow on it). Then I can click anywhere inside the rectangle to select it. When it's selected, a dashed red rectangle will appear around it. Then I can use the EditFill Colour menu item to open the fill colour selector. In Figure 10.15, I have selected the Colour radio button and specified 20% cyan, 20% magenta, 0% yellow and 0% black. The rectangle's black outline can be removed by selecting the EditPathLine Colour menu item, which will open the line colour selector. Click on the Transparent radio button to remove the outline.

Figure 10.15: FlowframTk — Setting the Fill Colour
 
Image of colour selector dialog window.

This rectangle now needs to be identified as a flow frame. Make sure it's still selected and use the menu item TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Frame to open the flow frame selector. Set the Type to Flow and this will enable the flow frame related options. Give the frame a label (for example, “main”) and select the Border As Shown option. The margins can also be set to prevent the document text running against the border. I've chosen 5 mm for each margin, as shown in Figure 10.16. The even page options can be ignored since the result will be a single-paged document. Again click on the green tick to save the changes and close the dialog window. The selected rectangle in the main window should now have a pale grey rectangle inside it that shows the frame's margins (see Figure 10.17).

Figure 10.16: FlowframTk — Setting Flow Frame Data
 
Image of frame setting dialog window.

Figure 10.17: FlowframTk — Flow Frame Data Assigned
 
Image of main window. The rectangle has a filled background and a faint grey inner rectangle marking the margins.

Now I want to create a static frame in the currently unfilled narrow region on the right hand side of the page. This will just provide a background colour. I will later make some other frames on top of this one that will contain text and images. The process is much the same as for the previous frame. The rectangle tool is selected, a rectangle is drawn with opposing corners at (132 mm,0 mm) and (210 mm,297 mm). The fill colour is set to 0% cyan, 0% magenta, 50% yellow, 0% black, and the outline is set to transparent. However, the frame should now be a static frame, so once the rectangle has been created, select the menu item TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Frame and set the Type to Static. This enables a different set of options to earlier, but for this frame the only extra information needed is the label. I've set this to “sidepane”, as shown in Figure 10.18. Again, click on the green tick button to save the changes and close the dialog window.

Figure 10.18: FlowframTk — Setting Static Frame Data
 
Image of the frame setting dialog window. Additional options are now available.

It's a good idea at this point to save the image in case something goes wrong. There are two native file formats: .jdr (binary) and .ajr (ASCII). The binary version has greater precision but the ASCII version works better with version control systems (see §13.2 Version Control). Since I use version control and I don't need double-precision for my co-ordinates, I'm going to use the ASCII version (.ajr). To save to a new file use the FileSave As menu item and select the appropriate file type (in my case, flowframtk ascii file (*.ajr)), as shown in Figure 10.19.

Figure 10.19: FlowframTk — Saving the Image
 
Image of save as dialog window.

Now I need an area in which to put the book title (which appears on the top right of Figure 10.7). Again I need to use the rectangle tool to use as a guide for my frame. My rectangle has opposing corners at (136 mm,5 mm) and (206 mm,62 mm). In this case I don't need to change the colours as I'm only using the rectangle as a guide to define a borderless dynamic frame. As before, I need to select this new rectangle and use the TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Frame menu item to open the dialog box. Now I set the Type to Dynamic and the label to “title”, but this time the Border option needs to be set to None as shown in Figure 10.20.

Figure 10.20: FlowframTk — Assigning Dynamic Frame Data
 
Image of frame settings dialog window.

At the bottom of this dialog window is an area labelled Contents with a button labelled Edit next to it. This allows you to set the contents of a dynamic or static frame, just as you can do using commands such as \setdynamiccontents, described earlier. Click on this Edit button to add the frame contents, which is the LaTeX code from Example 54:

\raggedright\bfseries\scshape\Large
Oh No! The Chickens Have Escaped

As shown in Figure 10.21. Click on the green tick button to save these changes and return to the previous dialog window, and click on the green tick button there to save and close that window.

Figure 10.21: FlowframTk — Setting the Frame Contents
 
Image of the frame contents dialog window. This is a mini text editor (the same one used for the preamble code). The contents are:
\raggedright\bfseries\scshape\Large
Oh No! The Chickens Have Escaped
End of Image.

Links to bitmap images can be included in flowframtk images and they can also be used as frame backgrounds. Note that only the bitmap location is saved in an .ajr or .jdr file. You can choose whether this location is an absolute path or a path relative to the .ajr/.jdr file. To do this, use the SettingsConfigure Image Settings menu item to open the image settings dialog window (shown earlier in Figure 10.9). Select the Bitmaps tab and either check or uncheck the Use relative paths for bitmaps button. You can also use this panel to select which LaTeX command to use for inserting images. In Figure 10.22 I have set this to \includegraphics.

Figure 10.22: FlowframTk — Bitmap Options
 
Image of configuration dialog with the Bitmaps tab selected.

To insert a bitmap, make sure you are in select mode (ToolsSelect) and use the menu item BitmapInsert Bitmap to open the bitmap selector, shown in Figure 10.23.

Figure 10.23: FlowframTk — Bitmap Selector
 
Image of open dialog window with list of PNG files.

Select the required bitmap (I've chosen the sample image chicken.png) and click on the Open button. This will insert the bitmap into the image, but this particular image is far too big so it needs to be scaled. Note that, just like the transformation options in \includegraphics, this scaling doesn't modify the actual bitmap file. The newly inserted bitmap should already be selected. To scale it use the TransformScale menu item to open the scaling dialog window and set the scale factor, as shown in Figure 10.24. I've set the scale factor to 0.1.

Figure 10.24: FlowframTk — Scaling
 
Image of scale dialog window. The 'scale both' radio button is set and a value of 0.1 entered.

The bitmap is now the correct size but is in the wrong position, as new bitmaps are always inserted with the top left corner at the origin. With the select tool set, you can use the mouse to drag the bitmap to the desired location, as shown in Figure 10.25.

Figure 10.25: FlowframTk — Bitmap Moved to the Right
 
Image of main window showing the left (purple) rectangle, right (yellow) rectangle, a smaller rectangle on the right and an image of a chicken below it.

This bitmap can be set as the background to a static frame in a similar manner to the earlier static frame (labelled “sidepane”). So make sure the bitmap is selected, use the TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Frame menu item to open the dialog box, and set the Type to Static, the label to, say, “titleimage” and make sure the Border is set to As Shown. I repeated this process for the sample image dummy-logo.png (with the scale set to 0.2) and labelled this frame “logo”. The image so far, with both bitmaps, is as shown in Figure 10.26.

Figure 10.26: FlowframTk — Logo Added
 
Image of main window. As before but now has the logo image near the bottom right hand corner.

Now I just need another dynamic frame for the rest of the side panel information. Again this is done by creating a rectangle, selecting it and using the TeX/LaTeXFlow FramesSet Frame menu item to open the frame dialog window. Here I've set the Type to Dynamic, the label to “bookdata” and set Border to None. I've changed the Alignment option to Middle which will vertically balance the frame's contents. The contents can again be set by clicking on the Edit button, which will open the mini-LaTeX editor. The contents are as follows:

\begin{tabular}{@{}ll}
Genre:    & Children's Illustrated \\
          & Fiction\\
RRP:      & £5.99\\
Format:   & Paperback\\
Pages:    & 30\\
Pub Date: & 1st August 2014\\
ISBN:     & 978-x-xxxxxx-xx-x
\end{tabular}

\bigskip

\begin{center}
\colorbox{white}{\includegraphics{barcode-qr}}
\end{center}

(If you prefer, you could convert barcode-qr.pdf to a bitmap and insert it in a similar manner to the other bitmaps.) Click the green tick to save and return to the Set Frame dialog, shown in Figure 10.27.

Figure 10.27: FlowframTk — Setting the bookdata Frame
 
Image of frame setting dialog window.

The final image is as shown in Figure 10.28. Make sure you save it to an .ajr or .jdr before proceeding to the export function. The flowframtk application can only load its own native files. It can't load the files it exports, so if you need to make any modifications you'll need the .jdr/.ajr file.

Figure 10.28: FlowframTk — Data Completed
 
Image of main window. As earlier, but now has an extra rectangle on the right (yellow) area below the chicken image.

Now that the image is complete with all the required flowfram data, you can export to a LaTeX class or package file using the FileExport menu item. I'm going to export to a class file, so I've set the file type filter to Class (*.cls) as shown in Figure 10.29.

Figure 10.29: FlowframTk — Export to a Class File
 
Image of export dialog window.

My examples directory now contains the files: aisheet.ajr, aisheet.cls along with my original image files chicken.png, barcode-qr.pdf and dummy-logo.png. Now I just need to add a LaTeX document that uses this new aisheet class file:

\documentclass{aisheet}
\begin{document}\raggedright

\section{About the Book}

A fun illustrated children's story about some escaped chickens. 
Fred and Mabel are looking after Granny's chickens for the day
but, oh no, they've escaped. Will Fred and Mabel find them all
before the chickens get into the road or get eaten by the hungry fox?

\section{About the Author}

Dickie Duck lives somewhere or other and won the best fowl book
award in 2014. He likes writing silly stories about ducks and
chickens.

\section{Keypoints}

\begin{dinglist}{118}
 \item A fun way of teaching children to count.

 \item Children will enjoy the repetition and rhyme.

 \item Features chickens doing stupid things.

 \item Completely fictitious book encourages children's
imaginations.
\end{dinglist}

\section{Marketing}

\begin{dinglist}{118}
 \item Written by award-winning author.

 \item Illustrated by world famous artist.

 \item Some other really interesting marketing information.
\end{dinglist}

\section{Contact}

\begin{tabular}{@{}l}
Dickie Duck\\
1 The Street\\
Another Village\\
Some City\\
Imagineshire\\
YZ1 2AB
\end{tabular}
\end{document}

The resulting document is shown in Figure 10.30. You can download or view this example document.

Figure 10.30: Advance Information Sheet (via flowframtk)
 
Image of advance information sheet. This image is very similar to the one from the previous example, except that it's more colourful.


This book is also available as A4 PDF or 12.8cm x 9.6cm PDF or paperback (ISBN 978-1-909440-07-4).

© 2015 Dickimaw Books. "Dickimaw", "Dickimaw Books" and the Dickimaw parrot logo are trademarks. The Dickimaw parrot was painted by Magdalene Pritchett.

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