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5.2.3 Spoken Languages

The europecv class also has commands to produce the section on your spoken language skills. This section is started by identifying your mother tongue using:

\ecvmothertongue[vspace]{language}

For example:

\ecvmothertongue{English}

The language table header is typeset using:

\ecvlanguageheader{symbol}

where ⟨symbol⟩ is a footnote symbol used in the table footer. Each row of the language table is then typeset using:

\ecvlanguage[vspace]{language}{l1}{l2}{l3}{l4}{l5}

except for the last, which is typeset using:

\ecvlastlanguage[vspace]{language}{l1}{l2}{l3}{l4}{l5}

where ⟨vspace⟩ again indicates any vertical space that should be inserted after the row, and ⟨language⟩ is the name of the language. The other five arguments ⟨l1⟩, …, ⟨l5⟩ should be brief descriptions relating to:

l1
understanding (listening);
l2
understanding (reading);
l3
speaking (spoken interaction);
l4
speaking (spoken production);
l5
writing.
Each of these arguments should be in the form:

\ecvCEF{level}{descr}

where ⟨level⟩ is the self-assessment level code and ⟨descr⟩ is a brief description. There are some convenient shortcuts described in Table 5.1.


Table 5.1: Convenient Shortcut Commands for \ecvCEF
Shortcut Expansion
\ecvAOne \ecvCEF{A1}{basic user}
\ecvATwo \ecvCEF{A2}{basic user}
\ecvBOne \ecvCEF{B1}{independent user}
\ecvBTwo \ecvCEF{B2}{independent user}
\ecvCOne \ecvCEF{C1}{proficient user}
\ecvCTwo \ecvCEF{C2}{proficient user}

After the last language row, the table footer is typeset using:

\ecvlanguagefooter[vspace]{symbol}

where ⟨symbol⟩ should be the same as used in \ecvlanguageheader.

Example

\ecvmothertongue[10pt]{English}
\ecvlanguageheader{(*)}
\ecvlanguage{French}{\ecvCOne}{\ecvCTwo}{\ecvBTwo}{\ecvCOne}{\ecvCTwo}
\ecvlastlanguage{German}{\ecvATwo}{\ecvATwo}{\ecvATwo}{\ecvATwo}{\ecvATwo}
\ecvlanguagefooter{(*)}

Unless you use either narrow Arial or condensed Helvetica, the language table may appear cramped. For this example to work, I used the following settings to adjust the left column width and the gap on either side of the vertical rule:

\ecvLeftColumnWidth{2cm}
\ecvColSep{4pt}

and set the default font size to 10pt:

\documentclass[helvetica,narrow,a4paper,10pt]{europecv}

This produces the output shown in Figure 5.4 unless you use the booktabs class option:

\documentclass[helvetica,narrow,a4paper,10pt,booktabs]{europecv}

in which case it produces the output shown in Figure 5.5.

Figure 5.4: Example Language Table
 
(This is just a rough approximation of the output without the horizontal and vertical rules:)

Mother
tongue(s)
English
Self-
assessment
European level(*)
Understanding Speaking Writing
Listening Reading Spoken
interaction
Spoken
production
French C1 Proficient
user
C2 Proficient
user
B2 Independent
user
C1 Proficient
user
C2 Proficient
user
German A2 Basic user A2 Basic user A2 Basic user A2 Basic user A2 Basic user
(*)Common European Framework of Reference (CEF) level
End of Image.

Figure 5.5: Example Language Table (booktabs option)
 
As previous table but with fewer vertical rules


This book is also available as A4 PDF or 12.8cm x 9.6cm PDF or paperback (ISBN 978-1-909440-07-4).

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